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Subject: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling

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Kimberly    Posted 06-04-2018 at 11:52:16 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • How heavy is the rear wheel without any fluid in the tyre? I want to do some preventive maintenance on the wheel as far as rust and paint. I thought I would be able to do some sand blasting using one of those small hand held units and then prime and paint by just moving the tractor and rotating the wheel. However, a friend thought that was not a good idea and that I should remove the wheel. I am unsure that I could handle the wheel alone and don't want to get hurt if the wheel pushed me over and landed on top of me.

    Dad replaced the bands (if that is what they are called) and used the hub/centre of the old wheels. The wheels need the rust removed and painted. I let the Old Girl go down after Mum died; I got depressed, and I want to correct the harm I did by neglecting her.

    Kimberly    Posted 06-10-2018 at 10:36:03 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Thanks everyone for your posts on this. I may leave this for now until I can have the proper help or hire someone.

    Mike    Posted 06-06-2018 at 14:00:11 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Safety first. Loaded rear wheels are hard to handle for the most experienced folks. With regard to your hand held sand blaster, I have a hand held soda blaster that I use to clean small parts. Works great and the soda doesn't mar or etch plastic or rubber (sand will scratch plastic and rubber).

    Kimberly    Posted 06-06-2018 at 14:19:37 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • What is soda and where do you purchase it?

    TonyC    Posted 06-07-2018 at 10:36:02 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Soda blasting (wet 0r dry) will not work on rust. I did three frame on Car restorations and while soda blasting did the best job overall, Separate operations to remove rust were necessary to prepare for prime and paint. No distortion, smooth surface (needed scuffing to prime) media blasting and sand blasting did the best job on rusty panels and frames. I did strip a body and fenders of a '37 Cad with a Harbor Freight portable tank sand blaster. Hooked my 5hp CH portable gasoline powered compressor to my 2hp shop air compressor and it did a good job, messy but good.

    Soda blasting is not a home gamer operation. Unless using a machine with water injection the dust cloud created looks the atom bomb tests in St George, Utah. A decent sized blast rig requires high air pressure and a high Cubic ft/ minute flow rate. THe small ones are OK for tiny to small work but even with a 150 psi 30 gallon tank compressor you will spend more time waiting for the compressor to fill than you will blasting the surfaces. Then there is cleanup.

    Quickest, easiest and least expensive but most labor intensive is to wire brush and sand off as much rust as you can, then use a rust converter/sealer like CerroSeal RustNoMore or one of the POR products, prep, prime with a good etching primer paint, nip the runs, color sand and buff. Just kidding about the color sanding. It's a farm tractor.

    Tony

    Mike    Posted 06-06-2018 at 17:57:18 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • soda works great on paint, so so on rust if it is heavy.

    Mike    Posted 06-06-2018 at 17:13:29 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Baking soda. Commercial grade. You can buy it a Harbor Freight along with a hand held soda gun similar to the one shown in your photo. I wear a mask/respirator and goggles.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 06-06-2018 at 06:37:26 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Another option is to call your local AG Tire dealer as they usually have a mobile service that will come out right to your place and do tire/rim repairs.

    Tim Daley(MI)

    Kimberly    Posted 06-05-2018 at 20:25:32 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • I inspected the wheel today and I don't see how one could use a hydraulic lift; such as an engine lift, to handle the wheel.

    I was thinking that if I removed the fenders, then perhaps that would allow me enough room to clean the rust from the wheels and prime and paint them on the tractor. It won't be a first rate job but it will help with the rust issue. I noticed the slot in the hub for adjusting the brake shoes; are rubber plugs available to cover these holes? If not, then duct tape will probably do the job of keeping the sand blasting dust out of the drums.

    I am not sure if the compressor can handle the rate needed for sand blaster, it was a good unit new but it is old and worn. I have been kicking around the idea of getting a new compressor head when funds are available.

    BlasterStumps    Posted 06-06-2018 at 16:33:14 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • If you have hat rims, unless you have a special hoisting clamp, bracket, or basket for a wheel and tire assembly like you have, the wheel would have to come off so that you could run a chain through the center hole. You are right there. I'm thinking you are on the right track with the idea of leaving the wheel on and cleaning it up the best you can like that. I don't think I would mess with the fenders though. Taking them off can be a real pain. I would just do a section on wheel then roll the tractor a few feet then do more, etc. etc. Just my 2
    Have a great one,
    Mike

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 06-05-2018 at 05:40:28 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Kimberly -don't try anything by yourself for your own safety; get some muscle to help. Painting the outside will not do much -the important surface is on the inside. I don't know what a portable, hand held sand blaster is. You can check tires to see if they are loaded first by rotating around until the valve stem is at the 6 O'Clock position at the bottom and pressing the stem down. If any liquid is in there, it should squirt out. I suggest you remove the entire wheels/tires, take them to your local service station with a mechanic on duty, or a local tire dealer as they can remove the tires and tubes for you with the right equipment. To me, what they charge is well worth it -my guy charges $7 per tire. Then you can get the rims sand blasted and painted. I also suggest you talk to your local bump shop guy as they can do all that work, and, you may be surprised at the low cost of doing that. If you have original hat rims and you are trying to restore them, use a good paint. I'd avoid any metallic/aluminum shade as they fade after a few years and rub off, literally. On my hat rims, I use a paint by IH/CASE called Silver Argent made for wheels. It has held up well for over 15 years now. I also use an original Dearborn Tractor Jack for when I have to change out wheels. It makes the job so much faster and easier. I cannot stress enough the importance of not attempting to do this by yourself. Even if the tires are not loaded, their mere bulk and stand alone weight can be a task no matter how big and muscular one is. removing and walking the wheels off of the hubs then rolling them off to a safe place requires concentration and patience. If one feels the wheel is getting away from you let it go, don't try to stop it. Two people make it easier to maneuver. use another tractor with a boom to load wheels on your trailer. If tires are/were loaded, you will want new tubes and get inside of tires washed out good. The tire dealer can do that too. Just my advice on how I do it.

    FORD 8N & DEARBORN TRACTOR JACK:

    FORD 8N CENTER DISCS ON 9 X 28 HAT RIMS; COMPLETELY RESTORED, w/ SILVER ARGENT PAINT:



    Tim Daley(MI)

    Kimberly    Posted 06-05-2018 at 11:25:02 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • OK guys, you have scared me enough that I am not going to attempt to take the wheel off by myself or without proper tools to do this job. My main concern was to clean up the wheels; remove the rust, and prevent any more damage to the metal. Dad had new rims installed but kept the centre part of the wheels. The tubes had leaked and rusted the rims to the point that he did not feel they could be repaired. He did not refill the wheels with any fluid; I keep meaning to have that done. There is considerable rust that I want to address.

    I am guessing that the jack in your photo is operated from the tractor's own hydraulic lift; that is really neat.

    I am including a photo of the sand blaster thing that I was going to use. I purchased it at Lidl one day with the idea of cleaning off the rust on the wheels.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 06-05-2018 at 15:36:57 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Yes, the center discs are removable from the rims, and it is most always just the rim that gets rusted out. Filling the tires with liquid ballast is not a requirement, only a recommendation wen extra weight is needed. If your intents are for semi-light duty like plowing or mowing, and even moving dirt or snow, probably not needed. Have you used that hand-held sandblaster unit? What is the cfi? Here's a document from our MANUALS on the tractor jack...

    Tim Daley(MI)

    36 coupe    Posted 06-04-2018 at 15:53:29 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • A floor crane cost 200 bucks.It will lift the loaded tire and wheel and let you move the wheel out of the way and help lift it and align the lug nuts.A come along wont do the job.Do to harbor freight or tractor supply and have a look at one.A floor crane can lift engines and welders out of pick up trucks.I ve used mine to split tractors.If a loaded tractor tire falls on you you will not walk again.

    Kimberly    Posted 06-04-2018 at 16:01:21 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • My BIL has one, if it is not in use; he restores Camaros, I probably can borrow it. Thanks for the heads up.

    Farmer Dan    Posted 06-04-2018 at 15:50:07 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • My neighbor is one of them guys that can hold you car up while you change the tire. Handy guy to have around.

    Kimberly    Posted 06-04-2018 at 16:02:11 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Oh, we use to call guys like that Moose.

    Tony C    Posted 06-05-2018 at 08:40:40 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Or Tiny.

    Kimberly    Posted 06-04-2018 at 14:04:57 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • OK, either leave the wheel on and do the best I can in place; or, maybe I can rig a hoist in the shed using the come-along. I can't lift one hundred pounds; a 50 lb bag of fertilser is a chore. So handling the wheel is out of the question.

    One axle has a slight leak to it; that job is a worry because I know you have to preload the bearings properly and I have never worked on such things.

    K.LaRue-VA    Posted 06-04-2018 at 15:13:06 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • On the 8N the single biggest reason the axle seals leak is parked on a side slope, or overfilled sump. The next most likely reason would be loose axle nuts. When they have been run loose it quickly wears out the splines in the hub, so they wobble. Once the hub is worn, tightening the axle nut just bottoms out without locking the hub in the splines. I have successfully shimmed an old hub with strips of metal in the splines. It is still tight and only oozes a little when I run on a side slope. One of these days I'm going to get around to replacing the axle seals and install a new hub.

    Kimberly    Posted 06-04-2018 at 15:59:52 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Now that makes me feel good LOL. Yes, I have heard about not parking it for long periods on a slope. However, I noticed the oil pattern change when parking it in the shed. It isn't bad but I do think it is the seal. I will take a photo and post it. I have only noticed it on one side.

    John in Mich    Posted 06-04-2018 at 15:34:51 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Where have I heard "get a round to it" before? Oh yeah. Here and on my wife's memory recorder. LOL

    Kimberly    Posted 06-04-2018 at 15:56:52 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Dear, when are you going to get around to repairing the leaking toilet? LOL

    John in Mich    Posted 06-04-2018 at 21:02:56 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • No, recently it was a leaking lav faucet. I tried to remove the nozzle screen and broke off the pipe inside. That was 10am. 7pm I was finished installing a new faucet. LOL (now)

    K.LaRue-VA    Posted 06-04-2018 at 13:39:07 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • If you need another reason for having more than one tractor, the best tool I have for handling rear tires is a boom pole. Even with just air, they weigh more than is easy to safely handle by hand. For an N-tractor the rear tire, rim, and center will weigh around 150 pounds (for the smallest size frequently used). I have managed to handle filled rear tires by hand in the past. If the tractor is jacked just enough to free the lugs, and the tire is kept perfectly upright while rolling it around... However, it is VERY easy to let a tire get just a little tipped. When it goes just a little too far, all you can do is jump fast, and hope it doesn't squash the cat.

    JMOR    Posted 06-04-2018 at 13:17:31 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • ~ 150-200#

    BlasterStumps    Posted 06-04-2018 at 12:52:42 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • Even empty, a rear wheel and tire are enough weight to take seriously. If you have some help it would be better. If you don't have to lay the tire/rim down after you take it off the tractor, that would also be good.

    Richard NY 2N    Posted 06-06-2018 at 16:21:08 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Rear Wheel Removal and Handling
  • I took the rears off my 601 a couple of years ago. Fortunately I have another tractor with FEL that I used to muscle the wheels. I used tire chains on each side of tire to move. Took them to a local sand blast business for paint/rust removal and then paint. It was late fall so that's why I paid them to do it. Tires are loaded plus wheel weights. Didn't remove tires from wheels except for one that valve stem got damaged needing tube replacement. The business covered replacement tube plus labor. They sure look better than the rusty mess they were before. Get some help and or pay for the removal etc, and be careful.

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