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Subject: This one was all me.

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Jerry    Posted 07-22-2018 at 16:15:21 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • This one was all me.
  • I have worked on cars and trucks all my life. One thing I've done frequently is drop an oil pan, so I had no doubts about dropping the one on my 8N, never in my wildest dreams did I imagine it would be that different.
    So realizing my mistake 1 bolt away from dropping the front end of the tractor on my head. I stopped and blocked up the tractor and started a little research. I found plenty of descriptions of how to do it but not a single video.
    Looking at what I had to do and where the tractor was parked I decided to put it all back together and move it to a better surface.
    I have also decided since apparently there is no video example of this I will document the procedure for others in my shoes.
    So it's back together and sitting on the concrete of my wood shed and next weekend, when I have some extra hands from my sons I will take it apart and repair the oil pump and make a video of the whole process.
    If any of you have constructive advice I would very much appreciate any and all information. This will be my first time pulling this or any tractor this far down. I'm also going to inspect the cylinders and replace many of the gaskets in the engine as I ordered a complete set of gaskets instead of just the oil pan gasket.

    K.LaRue-VA    Posted 07-23-2018 at 08:50:03 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Tractor folks generally live out in the sticks where streaming videos don't roam free (if at all). Most videos take way too long to load, and (after the wait) turn out to be worse than useless. Why search for videos when all you need is a picture? I just did a quick search and switched the results to "images". There are dozens of images out there like this:


    Can't say I'm impressed by the blocking under this one. Wood blocking is ok, but should be bigger "chunks" stacked so they can't slip or tip. Not sure what kind of floor that is. Looks like a mix of masonry, concrete, and wood.

    HCooke    Posted 07-23-2018 at 07:53:36 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • I assume you now know that the oil pan is part of the frame of the tractor. To remove the oil pan you have to remove the front axle and to do that you have to remove the hood (with gas tank). When you have the tractor blocked up under the transmission and roll away the front axle with radiator attached you are only a few short step of unbolting the engine and placing it on a stand.

    I prefer to stand up to do this sort of work as opposed to laying on my back. The oil pan is very heavy, Much easier to lift it off the engine than to drop it down. Also, easier to do the front and rear seals and oil pan gasket with the engine upside down on a stand.

    Your call.

    Jerry    Posted 07-23-2018 at 09:00:40 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • That picture is very helpful. I assumed the tires would go with the axle but I see what they did there. I'm definitely going to do some more studying before I start taking it apart again. If I had an engine stand I would probably do that. I''ll have to check, one of my sons may have an engine frame.

    HCooke    Posted 07-23-2018 at 12:08:31 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • " I assumed the tires would go with the axle"

    Yes, Disconnect the radius rods and drag links at the rear and then you can roll the front axle and radiator forward and out of the way.

    I use a cheap engine stand from Harbor Freight.

    Fire away if you have more questions.

    Jim    Posted 07-22-2018 at 20:01:23 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Might check the gauge and line to it, I tore an engine down once for a faulty gauge.

    Jerry    Posted 07-22-2018 at 19:21:35 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • My diagnoses went as follows; I performed an oil change. Oil pressure went to 60 psi instead of the 40 I was used to seeing, shortly after that it went to over 80 psi. I think some gunk got in the pressure relief. Then while I was driving it down the road there was a sudden awful racket and the oil pressure dropped to zero. The engine did not stop and while I know it was a terrible decision I continued the 1/4 mile to the house. I figured the damage was done. I shut it off and everything still apparently (with the exception of the oil pressure) was operating correctly.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 07-23-2018 at 05:41:53 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Just some tech info on the 8N: The 9N, 2N, and 8N's all used a 0-50 PSI Oil Pressure Gauge. The 80 PSI gauge didn't come out until the NAA Model, in September, 1952. Yes they will swap out no problem, and quite a few guys have the 80 PSI gauge on their N's. Anything over 45 PSI on an N means trouble. Ditto anything less than 10 PSI can mean a weak, worn out engine.

    Tim Daley(MI)

    Jerry    Posted 07-23-2018 at 06:55:22 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • This is the kind of information that is beyond useful. It would take hours of research to find this out. Thank you so much for contributing.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 07-23-2018 at 07:43:56 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Whatever. We're just trying to help-you asked. How does having the correct manuals and HOW-TO's documents become 'beyond useful'? Good luck...continue on your own, bud.

    Tim Daley(MI)

    Jerry    Posted 07-24-2018 at 10:12:37 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Beyond useful is the fact that if I had all the manuals and spent hours researching it I could probably find the information I required but you were kind enough to deliver just the knowledge I needed straight from memory as you either had to do the research or somebody gave you that information in the past. Then there is some stuff that's just not in the manuals.

    duey    Posted 07-22-2018 at 20:27:04 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • IF... as I mentioned below, the pickup tube broke off, there's a great good chance the crank will eat it up along with the racket... Of course, there will be no oil supply to the pump at that point...........

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 07-22-2018 at 18:17:15 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • HiYa Jerry-
    Welcome to the wonderful world of FORD Tractors Ėyouíre gonna have fun! But as with any subject, SAFETY FIRST must be practiced. Now, no one is going to kick you out of the NTC unless there is a rules violation, and then itís only a temporary ban. Understand that as in life, some have thicker skins than others and no one is out to disrespect, make personal attacks, or beat you up. That being said, my usual first question I ask newbies is do you have the essential manuals? It is strongly advised that as a new Ford Tractor owner/operator you get these manuals and read them religiously, preferably before you buy your tractor. How much mechanical experience one has isnít important, but it does help knowing which end of a wrench to use. Itís knowing how these machines were designed to operate, and what you can and cannot do with them no matter how many engines and vehicles youíve worked on. Todayís modern Internet offers many U-TOOB videos on how to do just about anything, but donít rely on them to gather your knowledge from. READ the manuals. The FORD 8N OPERATORíS MANUAL, The FORD 8N DEALER SERVICE MANUAL, and I&T F-04 MANUAL all have chapters on how to drop the oil pan as well as rebuilding the engine and other systems. Also, every FORD TRACTOR and IMPLEMENT MANUAL has at least a page on safety operation. You got lucky this time. Get the manuals and read before doing any work on them. We donít want to have to read about another tractor accident, or worse fatality.

    Respectfully,
    Tim Daley(MI)

    FORD 8N ESSENTIAL OWNER/OPERATOR MANUALS:

    ...and lastly, but most importantly, practice safety all the time. This is from the FORD NAA OPERATOR'S MANUAL...

    SAFETY IS JOB #1:


    duey    Posted 07-22-2018 at 18:03:07 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Check the pick up tube for failure/cracks... they have history...

    Bruce (VA)    Posted 07-22-2018 at 16:24:58 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • Why are you dropping the oil pan?

    Jerry    Posted 07-22-2018 at 17:10:59 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • The oil pump needs to be rebuilt.

    R geiger    Posted 07-22-2018 at 22:05:32 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • until you get it open there is really no way to know if the pump is bad or the oil pickup tube dropped, but if you lost oil pressure and continued to run it, there is a good chance that you have some damaged bearings.
    don't assume anything till you inspect it, it might save you some money.

    If it was mine, I would pull the engine and put it on a stand so that you can work on it. once you get the front out of the way, it is not that much more to pull the engine.

    Bruce (VA)    Posted 07-22-2018 at 18:12:24 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • How do you know it's the pump and not the bearings?

    Bruce (VA)    Posted 07-22-2018 at 18:11:56 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: This one was all me.
  • How do you know it's the pump and not the bearings?

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