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Subject: Tug 4 sale

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Bruce(OR)    Posted 12-04-2020 at 23:35:14 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Tug 4 sale
  • not mine.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 12-08-2020 at 12:36:02 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • In addition to the Ford-Ferguson Moto-Tug, I've always liked the later Ford Special Industrial Model 621 Tug. I posted a while ago on one in the N-News...click on LINK


    Tim Daley(MI)

    Ultradog MN    Posted 12-05-2020 at 16:47:53 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • I still like this one the best.
    It still sits on the flight deck of the USS Hornet which was sunk at the battle of Santa Cruz.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 12-05-2020 at 06:56:44 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • It's not a FORD and certainly not the Ford-Ferguson Moto-Tug released in April, 1943. I doubt the year is correct on his.


    Tim Daley(MI)

    Select-O-Speed    Posted 12-05-2020 at 08:47:04 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • Lettering on front guard reads "Case Tug". The engine appears to be something Case used. SoS.

    TheOldHokie    Posted 12-05-2020 at 11:30:12 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • A quick Google search appears to ID's it as a Case VAIW-3.

    A Case history book states that "By the second week in July 1942, wartime needs closed VA production for farm use, and only VAIW3 and VAIW4 (warehouse) units were produced. These were low-wheeled warehouse industrial-type units suitable for tow-motor work, characterized in many cases by a rear fender-weight arrangement of cast iron that weighed over 1000 pounds. The 3 and 4 number designations referred to single and dual rear wheel configurations. During wartime production, as many as 100 VAIW units were built daily". A photo caption says "note the running boards and the hood grab handles. This military model had special lighting for armed forces use - probably at airfields"

    TOH

    Steve Dabrowski    Posted 12-05-2020 at 19:10:39 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • Just a side note: Ford was the only major manufacturer of farm tractors during the war. They produced 102,183 units for farm and military use. This was due to Ford having been granted the steel allowance to do so while other farm equipment manufacturers were not granted this broad allowance. Harry Ferguson was the person responsible for this as he lobbied Congress and the President(FDR) himself for the allowance and he emphasized Ford's mass production capability as well as the farmer's importance to the war effort to get it done. He was motivated by the need to keep his own company in business, but he did everyone a great service with his gift for salesmanship.

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 12-06-2020 at 09:20:13 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • Yes sir, you are correct. I know you know this but will add the info here to keep the post relevant. I say this CASE was not released in 1942 because of this fact PLUS, on February 10, 1942 ALL commercial and civilian US manufacturing was shut down per US War Board directive with efforts to be focused on WWII war production ordnance and only essentials to the public offered. The Ford-Ferguson Moto-Tug was released in April, 1943. Up until FEB, 1942 about 10,000 9N's had been built. Contrary to what many Ford and non-Ford folks believe, the Ford-Ferguson 2N Tractor did not begin production at the beginning of 1942. The 2N Model began in October, 1942 and was the non-electric/non-rubber version, i.e. no electrics, steel wheels, and magneto for some parts made on it. In January, 1943, Henry "Harry" Ferguson went to FDR's farm homestead in upstate New York with a 9N and some implements to demonstrate how essential the farm tractor was to American life, much like what he did with his Ferguson-Brown Black Tractor in November, 1938 with Henry Ford which resulted in the famous ‘handshake agreement’ between Ford and Ferguson to produce the 9N Tractor. FDR was so impressed with the 9N and its capabilities, he bought the tractor and all the implements he had with him on this spot. FDR rescinded the moratorium on domestic manufacturing beginning with Ford but all other US companies were to follow shortly after. By April, 1943, standard 2N Production with electrics and rubber would begin ramping up as suppliers could now kick-start their production to fill the Ford pipeline. In the end, the number of 2N “Warhorse” Tractors numbered about 12,000 units. This fact also debunks the myth that ALL 2N Tractors were steel-wheeled warhorses –they were not. The 2N would be produced up until mid-1947, but technically all 2N engine blocks were built and serialized in 1946. 2N tractors would only be supplied until April, 1947, when the last of 2N production was run. Ford engineers (Ferguson was fired in 1946) had been busy working on the new model, the 8N, for release in July, 1947. Finally, another myth can be put to rest here. Neither Henry Ford nor Harry Ferguson came up with the steel-wheel warhorse idea. When material quotas were set by manufacturing rationing, it was the president of the Ferguson Mfg. Co, Roger Kyes, who was an engineer himself, found ways to obtain some steel. He suggested dealers purchase older Fordson tractor to be smelted down for reuse and used his contacts with foundry suppliers to obtain ingots for steel production. Copper and rubber were in even more demand and Kyes persuaded Ford engineers to design an austere version of the 9N tractor with no electrics and no rubber. Hence the 2N warhorse was born. The Moto-Tug had been a working venture long before the 2N warhorse model. Ford had been looking at a heavy duty industrial-type tractor to build since 1941. In November, 1942 Ford bought out the Mercury Mfg Company with their HD model and began modifying and redesigning their own unit. Based on a 9N matrix, 9N units were shipped from the Rouge to a Ford dealer in Columbus, Ohio, E.E. Shatz, who had an extra building large enough to operate a small production line. Outside suppliers for armor plating, hydraulic brakes, and other parts were shipped to Columbus and mated up with the 9Ns to be manufactured into Moto-Tugs. Ironically there were only about 12,000 Moto-Tugs built. Only a fraction of these have survived and are highly collectable models among Ford tractor enthusiasts to restore but finding OEM parts is not easy. The rest is History.

    Tim Daley(MI)

    Kent    Posted 12-07-2020 at 11:09:26 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Tug 4 sale
  • Typo in the last line, you have production number of 12,000. Your article states 3025, which I believe is much closer to accurate.
    Kent Smith

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