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Subject: Sericea Lespedeza

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Jack - Iowa    Posted 08-11-2018 at 07:31:51 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Sericea Lespedeza
  • Never hear of it, LUCKY YOU! I believe it is also called Chinese Clover.

    This is a very invasive plant which I understand was imported from China back in the 1800's in one of the Carolinas. It is now found in almost every county in Missouri and unfortunately on my farm in SE Iowa.

    Does anyone have a good idea of how to control it or even better, eliminate it? Burning seems to make it spread faster. Chemicals only control one years crop so gets very expensive. In process of mowing it with a sickle bar mower as close to the ground as I can get. Tough stuff! Makes me wish I had a HURD transmission.

    Ideas/knowledge PLEASE!

    Thanks,

    Jack

    pwbrown    Posted 08-15-2018 at 11:21:12 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • 1950-60 in NC we had two choices to take cropland out of production and be in the program to receive funds. two choices were pine trees and sericea lespedeza. grandpaw retired and put his farm in sericea. i was fortunate enough to buy part of the farm in the 70's. all efforts pretty much failed until i added SHEEP to the pasture. they kept it eat off down to dirt and now none remains. hence it never goes to seed and being eaten down to nothing the roots finally die. also in NC the DOT used it to stabilize deep cuts in road construction. it thrives well in poor soil and weather conditions.

    Jack - Iowa    Posted 08-15-2018 at 14:21:58 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Good to see your response. I lost a hard drive so lost your email address with it!

    I was aware Goats would eat Sericea but not Sheep. Would love to run a herd of both however we are talking CRP ground and I'm not allowed to graze it!

    Raised sheep as a teenager and would not mind doing it again. However in addition to the CRP, not having fences which would hold them stops me also.

    I did get that 14-73 mower running and it will clip it off very close as long as it is not too heavy.

    Thanks for your input!

    Jack

    Bruce Dorsi    Posted 08-11-2018 at 13:52:07 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • You may have already seen this.

    Jack - Iowa    Posted 08-11-2018 at 18:09:00 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • No, I had not seen the article. Shows a person needs to periodically go back and research a subject! I researched it pretty heavily about three or four years ago when it first appeared on my farm but found nothing like you did. Thank You!

    Jack

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 08-11-2018 at 09:08:12 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Contact your state DNR, conservation clubs, National Wildlife Federation, outdoors organizations, and all the hunting, fishing, trapping clubs as well. They watch closely and monitor all the invasive species that have taken over our country. Here in Michigan we've seen the Gobey, Zebra Mussel, Japanese Beetle and the silver carp (flying fish), European Milfoil, flowering rush, and several other plants that have invaded and taken over our native species. The Zebra Mussel was a blessing to the Great Lakes as far as cleaning up the water -clarity is like never before, but that also came with a price. The sport fishing industry suffered greatly as the mussel and the Gobey ate the small aquatic creatures and baitfish that the salmon and other sport fish fed on thus the salmon industry has all but disappeared over the past ten years or more. The European Milfoil and Flowering Rush invade and eventually takeover swamp lands and eliminate the cattail and other natural wetland species. Most people have no clue what it is and don't care. Back when the St.Lawrence Seaway was opened up, ocean going vessels brought the sea lamprey into the waterway, and now they are found in virtually every lake, stream, and creek in the state. It seems the only ones who are concerned are the DNR, sportsmen and conservation clubs, and the Federal Fish & Wildlife agencies. Michigan had a liberal, Canadien born governor, Ms. Jenny, several years back and she passed legislation that allowed international sea going vessels to dump their ballast tanks into the Great Lakes. Guess what happened next? The state and federal Fish & Wildlife Departments and DNR's have been working to control the silver carp from invading the Great Lakes coming up thru the Chicago/Illinois/Missouri river systems. So far the efforts have been successful. Look at the Florida Keys with their Burmese Python invasion. Research goes on to put a stop to their reproducing, but no luck yet. Meanwhile they continue to take over the top spot in the food chain as the alligator is no longer the king. He is part of the python diet now. A planned snake hunt resulted in not very many snakes being found nor destroyed. Biologists have projected their spread over the next 20 years and it is scary how far north and west it shows on their map. Further research shows that they will eventually mutate/evolve into a species that can withstand cold, and live in most any environment. Write your governor, congressmen, and representatives and every other elected official and voice your concerns. Not saying they'll do much, but being silent only helps perpetuate the problems.

    Tim Daley(MI)

    Dean    Posted 08-11-2018 at 09:41:39 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Not necessarily a good idea.

    I'm not familiar with the state laws of Iowa and such laws vary from state to state.

    Most (all?) states have lists of so-called invasive plants which a property owner is required to control under state law.

    I certainly would not intentionally open that potential can of worms.

    Dean

    Tim Daley(MI    Posted 08-11-2018 at 23:22:27 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Also, to add to my statement below, how can states mandate you the landowner control an invasive species when, as in the article Bruce linked it says, "There are no known biological controls that can be effectively used on sericea lespedeza." That's pretty much the same story for a lot of the invasive plant species, European Milfoil included. In the Great Lakes, the Gobey and Zebra Mussel have been here now for decades and they still have no way to control them. It's the same with illegal aliens. By liberal accounts, there's not a lot to do to control them, they've been here for years, so just let them be and absorbed into the environment... : > ) -sadly, that's true.
    Tim Daley(MI)

    Dean    Posted 08-12-2018 at 07:26:20 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Read the statutes. Specific performance is rarely enforced. The usual remedy is a fine.

    I'm not going to open that potential can of worms.

    Dean

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 08-13-2018 at 08:23:46 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Yeah, they probably can but don't for fear they will be sued. It isn't the landowners fault the stuff got imported here because of the lawmakers decisions to ease up on regulations and such. I'd contact a sportsman's group or even a State University and ask around. You can do that anonymously.

    TPD

    Tim Daley(MI)    Posted 08-11-2018 at 23:08:43 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • HHHMMM, I don't know if a state can force a landowner to control invasive species when they don't make an effort to. Here in Michigan, that European Milfoil is everywhere, private ad public land and I don't see any efforts made to try and control it. I don't think there is anything to control it with first of all. That stuff is all along public roads as it grows in ditches and wetlands where cattails use tog row but now have been choked out by the milfoil. If you fear being 'busted', then contact a local sportsman's club or Pheasants Forever, Ducks Unlimited, or the Wild Turkey Federation and they'll send an expert out to evaluate your property. Tell them you want to plant crops that will benefit those species and they will asses what you got going on thus telling you if something invasive needs to be addressed. Back in the mid-90's I had PF come out to my land and help me plot what to plant and where to plant.

    Tim Daley(MI)

    Dean    Posted 08-12-2018 at 07:23:56 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [No Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • Indeed, a state can do so, though it is rarely done.

    Dean

    Jack - Iowa    Posted 08-11-2018 at 18:05:18 [URL] [DELETE]        [Reply] [Email]  
  • Re: Sericea Lespedeza
  • You are correct. Iowa has such a list. Used to be they were the worse offender! However this plant is not on the list. Kansas is the only state I am positive has so named Sericea Lespedeza. Probably are others. I was surprised the article Bruce brought up came out of Kansas.

    Have to admit, I researched it fairly heavily about three or four years ago when it first hit my farm. Oldest infestation I've heard of in Iowa is about eight years old.

    It's a great article Bruce found!

    Jack

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